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RAID Awards

The RAID® Awards for Excellence in Working with Challenging Behaviour.

These annual awards were established to keep people ‘enthused’ about working with challenging behaviour and enabling those who often exhibit such behaviour to lead rewarding lives for themselves and those around them. Application is simple: approximately 1,000 words and the preparedness to discuss what you have written. The application may be on your own behalf or on behalf of your service and each successful submission will be published on our website.

The benefit of receiving such an award is primarily in satisfaction and status. The tangible benefit is in the form of a certificate, which states your receipt of the award. You will also be able to put the words “Recipient of a RAID® 2017 award for working with challenging behaviour” on your letters / emails, if you wish.

What the award looks for is: (A) a description of an assessment / intervention with a patient or group of patients, (B) the assessment/intervention will feature a positive approach, possibly but not necessarily the RAID® approach, (C) what you describe should “inspire” other people who read it – they should have ideas they want to implement in their practice too. Optionally, your submission may be supported by case-studies or other research papers you have written (whether published elsewhere or not), by testimonials from service users, or other written material.

The awards are made annually, and the closing date for submissions is the last day of October. You can make submissions at any time during the year, and they will be retained and examined shortly after the closing date.

Recipients of the 2016 RAID® awards for excellence in working with Challenging Behaviour:

Partnerships in Care, East Midlands Region (incorporates: Calverton Hill, Meadow View, Hazelwood House, Annesley House, and The Willows).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a service for residents with learning disability, this is a first class submission detailing how RAID provides Positive Behaviour Support and how to build it inextricably into the system, including the details of staff and service-user involvement, implications for training, policy and documentation, and how to integrate RAID-PBS into the electronic systems. Miraculous to cover it in around 1000 words.

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Tusla Children's Residential Services, St Stephen's Hospital (Glanmire, Ireland).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a children's residential unit this paper describes the impact of RAID interventions. Surprisingly comprehensive for such a short paper, it highlights the benefits of (A) refraining from criticism and "consequences" wherever safety allows, (B) analysing the challenging behaviour, (C) providing positive feedback, and (D) the teaching of new behaviours and skills. Moreover it looks at the (very positive) results and the specialist input required to maintain the RAID service.

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Rose Ward, St Andrew’s Healthcare (Northampton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a medium secure unit for patients with acquired brain injury, this neat piece of work strikingly demonstrates the effectiveness of giving feedback to patients as to whether their behaviour is red or green.

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Nest Lane, Together (Wellingborough, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a supported accommodation service for people with a range of complex needs, this paper describes the use of the RAID approach in such a setting, in clear simple terms. There are one or two theoretical glitches but the strength of the paper is that it demonstrates the power of simply playing down red behaviour as far as safety allowers and making every effort to notice and acknowledge green.

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Goal-setting, St Andrew's Healthcare (Northampton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a neuropsychiatry service, this detailed study describes the importance of goalsetting when working with patients with brain injury and the role of the RAID ladder in breaking down goals into subgoals. A thoughtful and detailed piece of work with good statistical analysis.

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Spencer South, St Andrew’s Healthcare (Northampton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a low secure specialist DBT unit for women diagnosed with BPD, this is a well written submission which highlights how DBT and the RAID approach can work hand-in-hand, and indeed how big the overlap is, with both approaches aiming to "pour in" adaptive green behaviour, both seeking to understand the function of behaviours, and both trying to utilise contingency management. Differences are played down, which is very RAIDy.

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The MAK Café, St Andrew's Healthcare (Northampton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a neuropsychiatry service this paper describes the usefulness and effectiveness of a "pop-up cafe" staffed by service users. Intended to develop patients' vocational and social functioning, the MAK cafe appears to do just that. As one of the service users put it: "We sell coffee, hot chocolate, ice cream and tea, it's always bloody good."

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ADHD Parenting Programme, Family Intervention Team, Gateshead Council (Gateshead, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

This submission describes a programme to help parents of children diagnosed with ADHD. It is clear on the aims of the program, the topics covered in the nine weeks it lasts, and the strategies that are covered to respond to those problems. We would like to have heard more about the strategies but even so, the information given provides a clear lead for anyone wishing to create a similar program, and results suggest that the parents who attend appreciate it and benefit from it significantly.

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Brain Injury Services, Partnerships in Care (UK).

Judge’s remarks:

This short, well written paper describes the background to and development of neurobehavioural rehabilitation for people with acquired brain injury and compares it with other forms of neuro rehabilitation. It goes on to describe the development of one particular neurobehavioural rehabilitation service and the impressive results it has achieved.

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Salisbury Support 4 Autism (West Drayton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

This is an impressive single case study featuring a 25-year-old man with a diagnosis of autism spectrum condition and a breakdown of his relationship with his family. The study tells the story of analysing the function of his challenging behaviour and implementing contingencies to virtually eliminate it and re-establish the family relationships. It is notable for the correct understanding of negative reinforcement, sophisticated communication strategies, and the deliberate encouragement of choice. A very attractive study.

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St Andrew's Healthcare (Northampton, UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set within a neuropsychiatry service this paper shows that those staff who attended RAID reminder-sessions subsequently record more green behaviours from patients than do staff who don't. We would like to have seen some discussion on whether this reflected a clinical improvement for the patients concerned or whether it was simply a recording phenomenon; we suspect the former. This paper will appeal to those who like statistics and statistical tests.

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Cygnet Health Care (UK).

Judge’s remarks:

Set in a psychiatric intensive care ward this submission focuses on occupying patients with activities that provide choice, and promote engagement in spite of security requirements. The absence of any statistics limits what can be claimed for this, but knowledge from other research tells us of the importance of social and occupational activities, and the real interest of this paper is in the listing of the activities provided by this service.

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